April 15, 2014

yes i just actually tagged a bunch of posts with ‘q’ thinking i was putting them in the queue but I guess I should have clued in to the fact that I was just hitting the reblog button huh? 

April 15, 2014
deoxify:

Playing in Color (by *Sakura*)

deoxify:

Playing in Color (by *Sakura*)

April 15, 2014

archiemcphee:

These beautiful geometric objects are 3D-printed sugar sculptures and they’re some of the prettiest pieces of candy we’ve ever seen. They were made by 3D Systems and The Sugar Lab. The latter is a micro-design firm created by Liz and Kyle von Hasseln, a husband and wife team dedicated to the awesome craft of creating bespoke, 3D-printed edible confections.

‘The overlap of technology, food and art is so rich, and the potential for customization and innovation is limitless,’ said Liz von Hasseln, cofounder of The Sugar Lab. Existing commercial applications for printable sugar include complex sculptural cakes for weddings and special events that are made possible only with 3D printing, and customizable confections for bake shops and restaurants. continued von Hasseln, ‘We see our technology quickly evolving into a variety of flavors and foods, powered by real food printers for professionals and consumers alike and we could not think of a more qualified partner than 3D systems to help make that a reality.’

3D Systems and The Sugar Lab introduced two food printing appliances at CES 2014, the ChefJet and the ChefJet Pro:

The ChefJet will deliver single-color prints; while the more advanced ChefJet Pro will dispatch full color prints. Both can produce either sugar or milk chocolate confections, in different flavors that include cherry, mint and sour apple, and will be available to the market later this year.

Click here to watch a demo of the ChefJet™ at CES 2014

[via designboom]

April 15, 2014

archiemcphee:

We share all sorts of amazing things that aren’t what they seem at the Geyser of Awesome. Here’s another one, and it’s a doozy:

You may think you’re looking at photos of beautiful undersea invertebrates, but these delicate beauties are actually models made of clear, coloured, and painted glass. Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, a father and son team of master glassmakers (previously featured here), painstakingly created these extraordinary glass models of invertebrate animals (jellyfish, snails, sea anemones, corals, hidroids, starfish, sea-cucumbers, squid, seaslugs and bivalves) from the mid 1800s until the 1930s.

Photographer Guido Mocafico visited the natural history museums which still house collections of the Blaschka’s work, including Harvard University Herbaria, the Corning Museum of Glass/Cornell University, and the Natural History Museums in London and Ireland, in order to create a marvelous series of photographs celebrating these exquisite models. He set the pieces against dark backdrops and carefully lit them to emphasize their different colours and textures.

As you can see here, the results that Guido Mocafico achieved for his travel and effort are completely wonderful. Click here to view more.

[via Faith is Torment]

April 15, 2014

staceythinx:

Some people find animal shapes in the clouds above. Illustrator Paul Middlewick found them in the maps of the London Underground for his series Animals On The Underground.

(Source: amusingplanet.com)

April 15, 2014

archiemcphee:

Here’s further proof that science and scientists are awesome:

A 7-year-old girl named Sophie wrote a lovely letter to the scientists at CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, politely asking if they could work on creating a dragon for her. She even included a drawing to help them out. (click here to read Sophie’s entire letter)

The scientists at CSIRO wrote back to Sophie:

We’ve been doing science since 1926 and we’re quite proud of what we have achieved. We’ve put polymer banknotes in your wallet, insect repellent on your limbs and Wi-Fi in your devices. But we’ve missed something. There are no dragons.

Over the past 87 odd years we have not been able to create a dragon or dragon eggs. We have sighted an eastern bearded dragon at one of our telescopes, observed dragonflies and even measured body temperatures of the mallee dragon. But our work has never ventured into dragons of the mythical, fire breathing variety. And for this Australia, we are sorry.

(click here to read the agency’s complete response)

But then something truly awesome happened. The scientists had a bit of a think, as scientists are wont to do, and decided to rapidly accelerate their Dragon R&D Program. That’s right, they made a dragon for Sophie - Toothless, a 3D printed titanium dragon, blue, female, species: Seadragonus giganticus maximus.

“Being that electron beams were used to 3D print her, we are certainly glad she didn’t come out breathing them … instead of fire,” said Chad Henry, our Additive Manufacturing Operations Manager. “Titanium is super strong and lightweight, so Toothless will be a very capable flyer.”

Toothless is currently en route from Lab 22 in Melbourne to Sophie’s home in Brisbane.

Now Sophie wants to work at CSIRO when she grows up.

Click here to watch a video of the creation of Sophie’s dragon.

[via Geeks are Sexy and Neatorama]

April 15, 2014

ruineshumaines:

Takashi Kitajima

April 15, 2014

staceythinx:

Artist and radiation physicist Arie van’t Riet inverts and colorizes x-rays to create these fascinating images.

Learn more about him and his work in this video from his TEDx talk:

(Source: mymodernmet.com)

April 15, 2014

(Source: smurfberries, via staceythinx)

April 15, 2014

trynottodrown:

Following a guideline and taking care not to touch anything (a single, misplaced fin kick by a diver can shatter mineral formations tens of thousands of years old), an underwater explorer threads her way through a stalagmite forest in Dan’s Cave on Abaco Island. From a diver’s perspective these caves are on a level with Everest or K2, requiring highly specialized training, equipment and experience, and the ability to work under tremendous time pressure. In these labyrinths, separation from the guideline can be fatal. (Wes C Skiles/National Geographic Stock) 

(via scinerds)

12:53am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z10Osw1D5g8Q8
  
Filed under: diving cave underwater q 
April 15, 2014
deoxify:

Scent of Rain (by *Sakura*)

deoxify:

Scent of Rain (by *Sakura*)

12:52am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z10Osw1D5g2x_
  
Filed under: frog q 
April 15, 2014

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Champagne owes much of its allure to its tiny bubbles. Unlike other wines, champagne undergoes a secondary fermentation in the bottle, during which the yeasts in the wine consume sugars and produce carbon dioxide, which dissolves into the wine. When opened, the carbon dioxide can begin to escape. Bubbles form in the glass around imperfections, either due to intentional etching of the glass or impurities left behind by cleaning. Once formed, trails of bubbles rise to the surface, swelling as more dissolved carbon dioxide is absorbed into each bubble. The bubbles then cluster near the surface of the champagne, occasionally popping and creating a flower-like distortion of the surrounding bubbles. The gases within the bubbles contains higher concentrations of aromatic chemicals than the surrounding wine, and the bursting of each bubble propels tiny droplets of these aromatics upwards, carrying the scent of the champagne to the drinker. For more beautiful champagne photos, I recommend this LuxeryCulture article; for more on the science of champagne, see Chemistry World’s coverage. Happy 2014! (Image credits: G. Liger-Belair et al.)

(via scinerds)

April 15, 2014
like-wildfire:

Neuronal Network by Zhong Hua
Captured by Johns Hopkins University School Of Medicine grad student Zhong Hua, courtesy of Nikon’s Small World project, this image depicts fluorescent neurons in the peripheral nervous system of an embryonic mouse under a light microscope.

like-wildfire:

Neuronal Network by Zhong Hua

Captured by Johns Hopkins University School Of Medicine grad student Zhong Hua, courtesy of Nikon’s Small World projectthis image depicts fluorescent neurons in the peripheral nervous system of an embryonic mouse under a light microscope.

(via the-science-llama)

February 10, 2014

staceythinx:

Images from Genesis, a book by photographer Sebastião Salgado 

About the book:

Genesis [is] the result of an epic eight-year expedition to rediscover the mountains, deserts and oceans, the animals and peoples that have so far escaped the imprint of modern society—the land and life of a still-pristine planet. “Some 46% of the planet is still as it was in the time of genesis,” Salgado reminds us. “We must preserve what exists.” The Genesis project, along with the Salgados’ Instituto Terra, are dedicated to showing the beauty of our planet, reversing the damage done to it, and preserving it for the future.

February 10, 2014

archatlas:

Calculation Rafael Araujo

(via staceythinx)

1:12pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z10Osw170-Osh
  
Filed under: art illustration 
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